crowdsourced weather patterns

imagine if you will, thousands of iPhone users being used to help generate the evening weather report.

what if that fairy tale becomes a reality?

with the introduction of iOS 8, that dream becomes a reality.  buried within the iOS SDK are APIs to read barometric pressure and airsensors.

https://bgr.com/2014/06/18/iphone-6-features-ios-8/

think beyond individual apps. just as motion tracking could be used for detecting highway patterns, weather tracking could help to paint a detailed picture of weather in an area with multiple sensors now available to meteorologists…

-brian

sobering statistics…

If a child doesn’t have a permanent home (e.g. adoption) prior to turning 18, here are some sobering statistics:

  • More than one in five will become homeless after age 18
  • Only 58 percent will graduate high school by age 19 (compared to 87 percent of all 19 year olds)
  • 71 percent of young women are pregnant by 21, facing higher rates of unemployment, criminal conviction, public assistance, and involvement in the child welfare system
  • At the age of 24, only half are employed
  • Fewer than 3 percent will earn a college degree by age 25 (compared to 28 percent of all 25 year olds
  • One in four will be involved in the justice system within two years of leaving the foster care system

Source: http://jimcaseyyouth.org/about/aging-out

Here are some common myths of adopting from foster care:

“It’s too expensive.”

“Children in foster care are too set in their ways to blend in with my family.”

“I’m not married, so I can’t adopt, right?”

“I don’t want to deal with the birth parents in my face about their child or deal with the child welfare system – it’s all just too complicated!”

The Dave Thomas Foundation tackles these common myths head on.  Read more below…

Source: https://www.davethomasfoundation.org/5-reasons-you-wont-adopt-from-foster-care-and-why-theyre-wrong/

anger and forgiveness

in talking with several people over the past few months about forgiveness, the question that is often asked is “it’s too hard to forgive them, how can i forgive them?”

in answering this, i had to process my own steps that i follow when i need to forgive someone. and what i realized, is anger is part of the process in coming to terms with forgiving someone.

we have to deal with our anger first before we can actually say we “forgive someone”. failure to not deal with our emotions of anger will mean that the “forgiveness that was given” wasn’t really forgiveness at all.

the anger that we experience when “we were wronged” (direct – someone talks behind our back) or “someone else was wronged” (indirect – plight of the orphan / homeless / a cause) has to be processed through in a healthy manner.

just some of my rambling thoughts.

on being a foster dad…

Dear child,

You changed our lives on Sept 16, 12:17am when we received the phone call that was asking if Haley and I would take you in. Without hesitation I motioned to Haley “Yes!” as she listened to the details that our placement contact was giving us. Thankfully I had told Haley that I was planning on staying up late and was keeping her awake, so when we got the phone call for you, we weren’t half asleep and we were ready to take you in.

You came to our house about two hours later and promptly fell asleep in the pack-and-play that is in the kids room.  I remember thinking “wow…this is actually happening, I have to take the time to remember this all before I forget and blog about this.”

So here I am four days later – getting a blog post saved to help me remember the experience of you helping me be a foster dad for the first time.

I have to say – there is a “shell-shock” experience that comes with it.  No amount of preparation can take the edge off the “shell-shock” experience of being a dad for the first time. While it’s been four days – I still think I’m trying to adjust generally to this experience of having a child as part of my experience of my journey home.

I want to remember staying up late with you on Monday night and letting you sleep on my chest as I slept on the rocker chair / sofa because you didn’t want to sleep by yourself.

I want to remember the experience of you going to the swimming pool and adjusting to being in the kiddie pool (you’re not too fond of water) and your eventual warming up to playing in the pool and playing with the water fountains.

I want to remember the different facial expressions that you give – you’re very expressive. The whole gamut of emotions that you exhibit: laughter, sadness, happiness.

I want to remember the experience of feeding you and watching you pick at what you eat and what you liked and what you didn’t like.  Oh, and you stuffing a handful of food in your mouth and me encouraging you to eat one bit of food at a time.

I want to remember the feel of your little arms and hands around my neck and feeling the softness of your facial cheeks.  And you reaching up to itch your head because my scruffy beard was brushing your head.

Finally, I want to remember the joy that you’ve brought to our home.

While I don’t know how long you’ll be with us, you’ve messed me up, in a good way. Thank you for being a blessing to Haley and I.

i love you,

-your (foster) dad

the more i need Him

in my drive into work today, i was reflecting about my relationship with God – i realize the closer i get to God in worship and in action, the more i realize the need for redemption.

i am a sinner. not worthy of what God has done to restore the relationship He and i have together.

the more i realize i need Him, the more appreciation i have for Him.

-brian